The Achievement Gap Initiative at Harvard University

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Welcome

Ronald Ferguson, Faculty Co-Director, Pathways to Prosperity, Harvard Graduate School of Education and Faculty Director, The Achievement Gap Initiative at Harvard University

category: Practice

tags: Pathways, employment

Conference

March 2013

In welcoming the conference participants, faculty co-director Ronald Ferguson notes the overwhelming nationwide interest in the conference, acknowledges the sponsors, and offers several overarching themes and guiding principles for both this event and the broader Pathways movement. He introduces the idea that we should frame the Pathways challenge with the intention of producing a "Sputnic Moment" that helps grab attention and mobilize progress in a manner similar to way that the Russian launch of Sputnic did in 1957. In addition, he offers initial framing for a call to action that might follow the conference.


Setting the Stage

Nick Pinchuk, Chairman and CEO of Snap-on Inc.; Dorothy Stoneman, Founder and CEO of YouthBuild USA; Bill Daggett, Founder and Chairman of the International Center for Leadership in Education; and Hilary Pennington, Director of Generations Initiative.

category: Practice

tags: Pathways, employment

Conference

March 2013

These four nationally-known leaders help define the challenges we must meet in order to create pathways systems that will prepare far more young people to lead successful lives. Pinchuk argues that the U.S. is in an economic war, and that the solution is to greatly improve the quality and status of career and technical education. Stoneman makes a compelling case that we cannot forget the millions of young people who have dropped out of high school, and that programs like YouthBuild can help re-engage these individuals while also preparing them for work. Daggett contends that the Pathways movement must be connected to the common core state standards, because they aim to prepare young people for the 21st century labor market. Finally, Pennington says the long history of education reform suggests the Pathways movement must be aligned with the deepest values of the American people and supported by hard evidence and data regarding what works in order to be effective.

powerpoint >>

Where are the Jobs for Young Adults?

Jonas Prising, President, ManpowerGroup (Moderator); Jane Oates, Assistant Secretary for Employment and Training, US Department of Labor; Moorthy Uppaluri, General Manager, Microsoft Global Academic Programs; David Bozeman, Vice President, Integrated Manufacturing Operations Division, Caterpillar; Andrew Sum, Professor of Economics and Director, Center for Labor Market Studies, Northeastern University; Rick Stephens, Senior Vice President, Human Resources and Administration, The Boeing Company

category: Research

tags: Pathways, employment

Conference

March 2013

One manifestation of the Pathways challenge is the extraordinary difficulty that today’s young adults face in finding jobs and building careers. Youth unemployment and underemployment is at near-record levels, and even many recent four-year college graduates are struggling. The session is a moderated discussion among a distinguished economist, senior business leaders and a leading policymaker. Andrew Sum begins by presenting research on the employment and wages of today's young adults compared to earlier generations. The panel then examines the education and skills young people need to succeed, the outlook for youth employment, and what we must do to improve prospects for young adults.

powerpoint >>

Redefining Corporate Social Responsibility

Jon Spector, President and CEO, The Conference Board; Doug Pruitt, Chairman, Sundt Companies, Inc. and Sundt Construction, Inc.; Michael DíAmbrose, Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Archer Daniels Midland Company; John Rico, Founder, President and CEO, Rico Computer Enterprises; Laila Worrell, Managing Director, Accenture; Mark Greenlaw, Vice President, Sustainability and Educational Affairs, Cognizant

category: Practice

tags: Pathways, employment

Conference

March 2013

While American business leaders have been engaged in education reform for years, their involvement has often been divorced from their core business operations. In this session, distinguished business leaders examine how the business community can become more deeply engaged in the Pathways movement. The session begins with a discussion of the responsibility of the business sector in the education and training of young people, and the specific ways in which business can contribute to these efforts. The panelists then consider the extent to which employers truly value multiple pathways (e.g., whether they are ready to adopt more of a focus on skills rather than degrees, and whether this varies across industries). The session concludes with a discussion of how the business community can help to create a ‚ÄúSputnik moment‚ÄĚ around Pathways issues.