The Achievement Gap Initiative at Harvard University

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The 2011 AGI Conference Video List

 

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The typical and atypical reading brain

Nadine Gaab, Harvard Medical School and Children’s Hospital, Boston

category: research

tags: parenting, cognitive ability, cognitive development, early childhood, literacy, instructional improvement, reading, remediation

Conference

June 2011

Because of links between early brain development and later reading success, Nadine Gaab makes the case for running brain measures on young children, to identify dyslexia, improve remediation methods, inform education policy, and allow children to reach their "intellectual potential."

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Rethinking the Importance of Early Developmental and Academic Skills in Predicting Achievement Gaps and Children’s Outcomes

David Grissmer, University of Virginia

category: research

tags: parenting, achievement gap, environment, development, myelination, academic outcomes, neural mechanisms

Conference

June 2011

Grissmer seeks to answer three key questions in his presentation through consideration of neuroscience, environment and development: 1. What are the most important early skills for parents, out of school programs and schools to develop in their children that will improve their long term outcomes? 2. What neural mechanisms might explain the link between these early skills and later outcomes? 3. How might these skills be developed in a cost-effective manner?

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What Parents Should Know from Brain Research Panel Discussion

Lead Questioner: William Dickens, Northeastern University and the Brookings Institution

category: research

tags:

Conference

June 2011


Family Processes that Support School Readiness

Susan Landry, University of Texas, Houston

category: research

tags: parenting, poverty, health, attachment relationships, socio-cultural theory, proximal development, contingent responsiveness, reciprocal parenting

Conference

June 2011

Landry explains the findings of a descriptive longitudinal study focused on school readiness skills (language, attention, etc), which uses data from the first 8 of 16 consecutive years that children were followed. Landry’s team is particularly interested in the role of the environment in poverty-homes, looking for positive influences in child’s longitudinal outcomes. They evaluate whether the role of the environment is different for children who were born biologically healthy, full-term into poverty homes verses those born at-risk biologically. Can positive, stimulating, nurturing home environment support each equally well?

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